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Hero Activities

Page history last edited by kay hones 2 years, 1 month ago

What does it take to be a hero?

 

Seven qualities:  courage, faith, perseverance, hope, humor, adaptability, moral direction

 

 

Why do we still have Mythic Heroes?

Do

we

have

modern

day

heroes?

4.

Heroes

are

more

than

companions on our

journey.

They

remind

us who

we

are,

and

who we

can

beco

me.

Why

do we

think/talk

about

heroes? To remind

us how

far

we

can

go

, and

how

high

we

can

climb.

Who gets

to

be

one?

5.

What

types

of

heroes

are

there?

Consider

the

following

types

and some

books that

feature

examples

.

Hero

on

the

Spot:

One

instant,

you’re

a companion or

passerby,

the

next,

you’re

called

on to

help.

Created

in a heartbeat.

( e.g.,

The

Outsiders

by

S.E. Hinton)

Survivor

Hero

:

Fighting

for

your

life. Lost,

abandoned,

victim

of

a natural

disaster.

You

rely

only

on yourself

. The

will

to

live

and

adaptability

.

( e.g.,

Island of

the Blue Dolphins

by

Scott

O’Dell)

Hero

Within

:

Physical

challenge.

Polio,

stuttering,

sickness.

Length

of

time

is long.

You

have

perseverance.

Determination.

Resiliency

. ( e.g.,

Sadako

and

the

Thousand

Paper

Cranes

by

Coe

rr

and

Himler)

Hero

to Others

Near

and

Far

:

People

who

consciously

set

out

to

help

others.

Physics

of

connectedness.

It’s

called

the

butterfly

effect.

The

theory

is that

everything

in the

universe

is

linked, beyond whatever

we

can

see.

These

invisible

links stretch

across

vast

reaches

of

time

and

space.

And they

are

so

strong

that

even

something

very

small

—as

small

as

a butterfly

could start

a chain

reaction

that

ultimately

makes

a huge

difference.

So

even

the

slightest

flutter

of

a butterfly’s

wings

somewh

ere

on this

planet

could actually,

over

time,

change

the

course

of

things.

( e.g.,

Kalahari

by

Jessica Khoury).

Hero

for

All

Times:

Some

of

these

heroes

serve

as

models to

others in

breaking

down barriers

and

as

leaders

inspiring

groups of

people.

( e.g.,

I

am:

The

Girl

Who

Stood

up

for Education

and

was

Shot

by the

Taliban

by

Malala Yousafzai).

2

Reading/Activity

2:

Collected

Poem

s

of

Lang ston

Hughes

and

The

Dream

Keeper

and

Other

Poems

by

Langston

Hughes

The

poem

“ Mother

to

Son”

can

be

used

for

an

introductory

reading

or

post

-reading

wrap

-up.

It

includes the

line,

“life

for

me

ain’t

been

no crystal

stair,”

which

is the

basis for

the

title

for

the

documentary

novel,

No

Crystal

Stair

by

Vaunda

Michaux

Nelson

(see

Reading/Activity

3)

. The

connection

be

tween

the

poems

of

Langston Hughes and

the

literary

and

historical

significance

of

the

Michaux’s

Harlem bookstore

can

be a powerful

teaching

tool

.

Listen

to

the

poem

on YouTube

read

by

Viola

Davis

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnAuAuipy0A

) and

print

a copy

from

the

Poetry

Foundation’s website

(

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47559/mother

-to -son

), then

consider

the

following.

Does

hearing

the

poem

read

change

your

initial thoughts and

feelings

after

the

first

reading?

What

do the

lines

below

mean

to

you?

What

difference

could it

make

in your

life

to

travel

the

rough-

worn

stairs?

After

reading

this,

what

does courage

mean

and

making

courageous

choices?

Reading/Activity

3:

No Crystal Stair

(a

documentary novel of the life and work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem

bookseller

)

by Vaunda Michaux Nelson

This book is told in first

-person narrative form, mostly by Lewis Michaux, but also interspersed with

other individuals who were affected by Michaux’s life. Solid storytelling combined with well

-

researched articles create a fascinating documentary novel of Lewis Michaux,

National Memorial

African Bookstore

owner and Civi

l Rights pioneer. Included in the book are photographs, news

articles, historical facts, poems, and quotes.

When a white banker told Michaux to sell fried chicken, not books, because “Negroes don't re

ad,”

he took five books and one hundred dollars and built a bookstore. Lewis rented a storefront, put

some books on display and talked and waited and talked some more. It soon became the intellectual

center of Harlem, a refuge for everyone from Muhammad Ali to Malcolm X.

“My life was no crystal stair, far

from it. But I'm taking my leave with some pride. It tickles

me to know that those folks who said I could never sell books to black people are eating

crow. I'd say my seeds grew pretty damn well. And not just the book business. It's the more

important bus

iness of moving our people forward that has real meaning.”

As a related activity, have students r

ead George El

la Lyon’s poem, “Where I’m From,

” available

online at http://www.georgeellalyon.com/where.html/

.

Lyon

is Kentucky’s 2015

-2016 Poet Laureate and she believes that “the question of where you are

from reaches deep.”

She wrote a list of things that describe where she is from, and she turned them

into a poem.

3

In poetry, data are the individual words in the poem. The patterns might be sounds or words or

phrases that are repeated again and again.

“Where I’m From”

is written using different patterns. Have students w

ork with a partner to identify

some of these patter

ns. Can they find words, sounds, or phrases that are repeated again and again?

Now, using one of the patterns identified in the poem, have students write a poem about where they

are from.

The poet uses the introductory phrase, “I am from” to start each li

ne. Use the same

pattern to write new poems

using the template below.

Say:

Remember, no one else sees the world as you do; no one else has your material to draw on. You don’t have to

know where to begin. Just start. Let it flow. Trust the work to find its own form.

The facilitator may

share first, if sharing out. Lead the class in a reflective discussion about the

activity. Sharing personal experiences through poems can build a sense of community and trust

. You

may use the suggested questions to guide the reflection.

Facilitator Reference:

How did it feel to write your poem?

How did it feel to share your poem

?

What were some commonalities across the poems?

What were some differences?

What is something that you learned from listening to other poems?

What was your favorite line from the poem? Why is this line your favorite?

What

was your favorite line from someone else’s poem? Why was this line your favorite?

What is something from your poem that might surprise people that you are glad you shared?

Now that you have heard other people’s poems, is there anything that you want to ad

d to

your own?

4

“I Am From” Poem Template

I am from.....

Adapted by Levi Romero

Inspired by “Where I’m From” by George Ella Lyon

I am from __________________

_________________ (an everyday item in your home)

from ____________________________ and

______

______________________ (products or everyday items in your

home)

I am from the ___________________________________ (description of your home)

__________________

_________________ (a detail about your home

– a smell, taste, or feel)

I am from

the___________________________________ (plant, flower, natural item)

The __________________

_________________ (plant or tree near your home)

whose long gone limbs I remember

as if they were my own.

I’m from __________________________

__ and _______________

___

__________ (a family tradition and family trait)

from ____________________________ and ____________________________ (family members)

I’m from __________________________

__ and ____________________________ (family habits)

and from__________________

_________________.

(family habit)

I’m from __________________________

__ and ____________________________ (things you were told as a child)

and ____________________________________ (a song or saying you learned as a child)

5

I’m from___________________________________ (a family tradition)

I’m from __________________________

__ (place of birth) and __________________________

__ (family ancestry,

nationality or

place)

__________________

__________ and __________________________

__ (family foods)

From ___________________________________ (a story about a family member)

__________________

_________________ (detail about the story or person)

__________________

_________________ (description of family mementos

, pictures or treasures.)

__________________

_________________ (location

of mementos

– under my bed, on the wall, in my

heart)

___________________________________________________________________________ (more description if needed)

___________________________________________________________________________

(more description if

needed)

 

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